source:  cyberdefensemagazine.com

Experts at Recorded Future have discovered a cheap RaaS, the Karmen Ransomware that deletes decryptor if detects a sandbox.

Security experts from threat intelligence firm Recorded Future have spotted a new ransomware as a service (RaaS) called Karmen. The service allows customers to easy create their ransomware campaign in a few steps and without specific skills.

Wannabe-crooks also track infected systems via a “Clients” tab, the Dashboard implements an efficient and easy to use cockpit that include various information such as the number of infected machines, earned revenue, and available updates for the malware.

The Karmen RaaS is very cheap, it costs just $175, buyers can decide the ransom prices and the duration of the period in which the victims can pay the ransom.

The Karmen ransomware is based on the open-source ransomware Hidden Tear, which was released in August 2015 by the Turkish security researchers Utku Sen for educational purposes.

The first Karmen infections were reported in December 2016, the malware infected machines in Germany and the United States.

The Karmen ransomware is a multi-threaded and multi-language ransomware that supports .NET 4.0 and uses the AES-256 encryption standard.

The malware is .NET dependent and requires PHP 5.6 and MySQL.

“On March 4, 2017, a member of a top-tier cyber criminal community with the username “Dereck1” mentioned a new ransomware variant called “Karmen.” reported a blog post published by Recorded Future.

“Further investigation revealed that “DevBitox,” a Russian-speaking cyber criminal, was the seller behind the Karmen malware on underground forums in March 2017.”

“However, the first cases of infections with Karmen were reported as early as December 2016 by victims in Germany and the United States.”

 

source: securityweek.com

Facebook on Friday said it disrupted an international fake account operation that was firing off inauthentic "likes" and bogus comments to win friends it would then pound with spam.

Facebook's security team spent six months fighting to neutralize what they saw as a coordinated campaign, according to Shabnam Shaik, a company security manager.

"Our systems were able to identify a large portion of this illegitimate activity -- and to remove a substantial number of inauthentic likes," Shaik said in a blog post.

"By disrupting the campaign now, we expect that we will prevent this network of spammers from reaching its end goal of sending inauthentic material to large numbers of people."

The ring used accounts in a number of countries including Bangladesh, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia.

The group tried to mask its activities with tactics like connecting with the social network through "proxy" servers to disguise where "likes," posts or other communications were originating, according to Shaik.

Facebook said the campaign aimed to trick people into connecting as friends they would later target with spam. The company said it had derailed the operation early enough to spare users that fate.

The leading social network this week said it has started weeding out bogus accounts by watching for suspicious behavior such as repetitive posts or torrents of messages.

The security improvement was described as being part of a broader effort to rid the leading social network of hoaxes, misinformation and fake news by verifying people's identities.

"We've found that when people represent themselves on Facebook the same way they do in real life, they act responsibly," Shaik said.

"Fake accounts don't follow this pattern, and are closely related to the creation and spread of spam."

Under pressure to stymie the spread of fake news, Facebook has taken a series of steps including making it easier to report such posts and harder to earn money from them.

source: darkreading.com

Akamai Networks since October has detected and mitigated at least 50 DDoS attacks using Connectionless LDAP.

 

Over the years, threat actors have abused a variety of services including DNS, SNMP, and NTP to enable and amplify distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against their targets.

A new method that appears to be gaining favor among attackers involves the abuse of Connectionless LDAP, a version of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol that many organizations rely on for directory services such as accessing usernames and passwords from Microsoft's Windows Active Directory.

In an advisory Wednesday, content delivery network and cloud services provider Akamai Networks reported encountering and mitigating at least 50 CLDAP reflection-attacks against its customers since last October.

 

About 33% of those were single-vector attacks, meaning they relied solely on CLDAP reflection to try and disrupt or knock their targets offline.

What makes the new technique dangerous is the extent of the amplification that can be achieved by abusing Internet-exposed CLDAP services, says Jose Arteaga, a member of Akamai's security intelligence response team.

 

source: wired.com

Two years ago, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek pulled off a demonstration that shook the auto industry, remotely hacking a Jeep Cherokee via its internet connection to paralyze it on a highway. Since then, the two security researchers have been quietly working for Uber, helping the startup secure its experimental self-driving cars against exactly the sort of attack they proved was possible on a traditional one. Now, Miller has moved on, and he’s ready to broadcast a message to the automotive industry: Securing autonomous cars from hackers is a very difficult problem. It’s time to get serious about solving it.

Last month, Miller left Uber for a position at Chinese competitor Didi, a startup that’s just now beginning its own autonomous ridesharing project. In his first post-Uber interview, Miller talked to WIRED about what he learned in those 19 months at the company—namely that driverless taxis pose a security challenge that goes well beyond even those faced by the rest of the connected car industry.

Miller couldn’t talk about any of the specifics of his research at Uber; he says he moved to Didi in part because the company has allowed him to speak more openly about car hacking. But he warns that before self-driving taxis can become a reality, the vehicles’ architects will need to consider everything from the vast array of automation in driverless cars that can be remotely hijacked, to the possibility that passengers themselves could use their physical access to sabotage an unmanned vehicle.